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DRIVER SERVICES


Deadbeats Don't Drive

This measure, formally known as the Family Financial Responsibility Act, allows Illinois courts and the Secretary of State's office to take strong action against parents that fall more than three months behind in making court-ordered child-support payments could face the loss of his or her driving privileges. The Illinois Family Financial Responsibility Law outlines two systems for driver's license suspensions for those owing child support:

System One – Court Ordered Suspension

A circuit court may invoke the law any time a judge rules that a parent is at least 90 days behind on child support payments. The court notifies the Secretary of State's office that the parent is in contempt of court for failure to pay child support. The Record of Non-Payment of Court Ordered Child Support Family Responsibility Law is completed, certified by the court and submitted to the Secretary of State's office which results in the pending suspension being loaded onto the driving record. The Secretary of State's office notifies the driver that a license suspension will become effective in 60 days. The suspension can be avoided if the Secretary of State's office is notified that the parent has met the court's requirements. Once the individual has complied with the child support obligations, the court will submit the Compliance of Family Financial Responsibility Law to the Secretary of State's office. The parent also may request an administrative hearing with the Secretary of State's office during the 60-day period following notification. A delinquent parent's driver's license will remain suspended until the Secretary of State's office receives notice from the court that the parent is in compliance with the court order of support. The court can order the Secretary of State's office to provide the delinquent parent with a Family Financial Responsibility driving permit to allow travel for work, or medical purposes. For more information, please call the Secretary of State's office at 217-558-2043.

The court may also order the suspension of a driver’s license for individuals who have been adjudicated as having engaged in visitation abuse as provided in 625 ILCS 5/7-702(d). The Visitation Order Violation form is completed, certified by the court and submitted to the Secretary of State's office which results in the suspension being loaded onto the driving record. The suspension will remain into effect until the court submits the Visitation Violation Compliance form to the Secretary of State. All documents must be entered in court and have the court seal in order to be acceptable by the Secretary of State. For more information, please call the Secretary of State's office at 217-558-2043.

System Two – DHFS-Ordered Suspension

The law gives authority to the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services to request that the Secretary of State's office suspend the driver's license of a parent who is 90 days or more delinquent in child support payments. DHFS reports cases of individuals who are 90 days or more in arrears in child support payments directly to the Secretary of State's office. The Secretary of State's office then notifies the driver that a license suspension will become effective in 60 days. The suspension can be avoided if the Secretary of State's office is notified by DHFS that the parent has met their child support obligations.

For more information, please call the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services at 800-447-4278. To avoid suspension of driving privileges, the individual must contact the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services and make payment arrangements for their child support obligation.

DHFS can direct the Secretary of State's office to provide the delinquent parent with a Family Financial Responsibility driving permit to allow travel for employment, searching for employment or medical purposes. All driving permit requests should be made directly to DHFS at 800-447-4278.